Oct 29, 2012

Shane Sinutko

During the late 1970s, I was way too old for Shane Sinutko (born 1965), but Brad, the kid I babysat for, was like totally in love with him.  He didn't actually say so, but every time Shane was on tv, we had to watch, and he collected Tiger Beat pinups of Shane as eagerly as I collected Shaun Cassidy and Leif Garrett.

And he was on tv a lot, reaching nearly the exposure of Moosie Drier.  A starring role on Code R (1977), guest shots on Quincy, Family, Baretta, The White Shadow.  A ton of movies, including The Shaggy D.A. (1976), Lassie: A New Beginning (1978), Samurai (1979).

And nearly as many after school specials, weekend specials, and schoolbreak specials.  Except Shane's tended to involve ample buddy-bonding and minimize or eliminate heterosexual interest:

Soup and Me (1978) and Soup for President (1978), an adaptation of the children's book series about the irascible Soup (Christian Berrigan), who keeps dragging his best friend Rob (Shane Sinutko) into mischief.

The Ghost of Thomas Kempe (1978), about two buddies (Shane Sinutko, Eric Tazlitz) who try to get rid of a mischievous ghost.

My Mom's Having a Baby (1977) and Where do Teenagers Come From? (1980), about sex education.

 During the 1980s, Shane studied martial arts and played a couple of musclemen, such as Theseus in Minotaur (1982), but then the acting roles dried up.  The transition to adulthood was difficult: Shane didn't act for over a decade.  During his late teens, he was literally stabbed in the back.  He was homeless for awhile, and had to live under a house.

But then Shane re-invented himself with stunt work (he is Matt Damon's stunt double), and has returned to acting, playing cops on The X-Files and America's Most Wanted and a jarhead on The Bourne Supremacy (2004).