May 20, 2016

The Indus River Civilization of Ancient Pakistan

The Indus Valley Civilization was lost until 1912, when British archaeologists stumbled upon seals in an unknown language from the village of Harappa, now in Pakistan.

Excavations revealed two huge cities, near modern-day Harappa and Mohenjo-Daro, and scores of smaller towns, a thriving civilization on the Indus River with five million people at its height.  It lasted for over a thousand years, from 3000 to about 1800 BC.

We don't know what the Harappans looked like, but they're probably the ancestors of the Dravidians of modern-day south India and Sri Lanka, so something like this.

They were very advanced for their era, with cities carefully laid out in grids, running water and sewage removal systems, bronze metallurgy, and even dentistry.  They had trade relations with ancient Sumer, 2000 miles away.

They had a writing system consisting of 400 to 600 symbols, but all we have discovered are thousands of short inscriptions, no long texts.  Their language cannot been translated, and probably won't be, unless we discover a Harappan-Sumerian Rosetta Stone.

We don't know much about their religion, of course, but we have uncovered hundreds of images of figures who may be gods, including some who are in the lotus position still used by Hindu ascetics today.







How can you not be interested in something like that, even without a gay connection?

But there is a gay connection.  Here is an artist's depiction of Harappan daily life.  Nicely muscled bodies.  It must have been a beefcake paradise.














This torso was once a complete statue of a chubby man with a penis.

Lingams (artificial phalluses) have been uncovered throughout the Harappan sites.  Archaeologists call them fertility symbols.  Or maybe the Harappans just liked to look at penises.

See also: The Naked Gods of Southern India