Mar 8, 2014

Stan Brock: Man-Mountain, Adventurer, and Philanthropist

When I was a kid, we were in church ever Sunday from 9:30 to 12:00, and again from 6:30 to 9:00, with exceptions only during our annual family vacation or when we were sick. And don't try that "stomach ache" routine, or your parents will decide to fix fried chicken while bringing you a bowl of chicken broth.

It didn't make much sense to stay home anyway, since there was nothing good on tv.  Totalitarian cartoons like Underdog and Tennessee Tuxedo.  Heretical Lutheran programs like Davy and Goliath

And that horrible nature program, Mutual of Omaha's Wild Kingdom (1963-1971), with grandfatherly Marlin Perkins showing us five minutes of footage of lions followed by five minutes of  "Just as lions take care of their families, you should take care of your family with life insurance. Mutual of Omaha..."


He had a couple of cute co-hosts, though: Jim Fowler, obviously his boyfriend (#9 on my list of Top 10 Nature Show Hunks), and the British-accented Stan Brock.

Neither showed substantial muscle on camera, so I was surprised to discover that Stan Brock had a superlative bodybuilder's physique (top photo)






Born in England in 1936, Brock spent his young adulthood working as a cowboy in British Guyana (he wrote about his experiences in All the Cowboys were Indians).  He got the gig on Wild Kingdom through his personal connection with Marlon Perkins, and stayed on through 1971.

During the 1970s, he tried his hand in two man-mountain movies:

Escape from Angola (1976); A zoologist and his family (Steven, Peter, and David Tors, sons of famous undersea director Ivan Tors) must flee from war-torn Angola and take off their shirts.

Galyon (1980): He's not a barbarian or a superhero, in spite of stealing the graphics from the 1979 Superman movie on the poster.  He's a man-mountain hired to rescue a couple from the South American jungle.

In 1985 and 1986, he and Peter Tors (left) starred in a fictionalized reality series, Stan Brock's Expedition: Danger.  A sort of Brazilian Tarzan, he ventured into the jungle to save people and animals from raging rivers, anacondas, poachers, and terrorists.  You can see it on youtube.

Later in the 1980s, he founded Remote Air Medical (RAM), a charitable organization that provides free medical care to people in isolated areas, originally the Brazilian jungle, but now mostly Appalachia.  He lives in Knoxville, Tennessee, and still follows a strict regiment of diet and exercise.




No wife mentioned, and a lot of time spent in the company of men.  Maybe he's gay.

See also: Mark Trail, a Substandard Tarzan.



Jackson Odell: Gay-Positive Teen Idol

Speaking of teen idols growing up, have you run into Jackson Odell lately?  When he was 14 years old, he filmed Judy Moody and the Not Bummer Summer (2011), based on the series of children's novels.  Judy and her brother Stink (Parris Mosteller) decide to have the best summer ever.  Stink's involves catching Bigfoot, with the help of his teenage friend Zeke (Jackson Odell), president of the Bigfoot Believers Association.

Zeke does not, at any point, melt into a puddle of hormones at the sight of a cute girl.  This is perhaps a first for any teenage boy character in the movies.






By the time the movie premiered, Jackson had grown about a foot.

He began making the sitcom circuit, with roles in Jessie, Arrested Development, and such gay-positive series as Modern Family and The Fosters. 

He signed on to a talent agency to pursue his singing career, and released covers of many contemporary hits, including the gay-themed "Same Love."    He explains: "This song has significance right now that I think is important to address.  Let people love who they love."

He has a fan page with 50,000 subscribers.



Meanwhile he kept growing and growing.  He's only 16.  I wonder how muscular he'll be at 25.












You can see him on The Goldbergs, about a Jewish family in the 1980s, as the teenage Barry's buddy.

Nostalgia tv always lacks gay content -- the fun for hetero audiences is in imagining what the world was like in the good old days before those pesky gay people existed. But since Jackson is so gay-positive, maybe he'll add some glimmers of gay subtext to his character.

Hutch Dano: From Teen Idol to Bear

In this picture, Hutch Dano has the fey, androgynous, sultry look of a Tiger Beat centerfold from the 1970s.  One expects to see Shaun Cassidy and Donny Osmond on the next page.  And his name is redolent of the 1970s,  It sounds like a combination of two Baby Boomer icons, Starsky and Hutch and Hawaii Five-O ("Book him, Dano!").

But actually the actor was born in 1992.









He got his teen idol cred in the Disney Channel teencom Zeke and Luther (2009-2012), buddy-bonding with fellow skateboarder Adam Hicks so obviously and so significantly that the one wonders if the gay subtext was intentional (Disney incorporates subtle and not-so-subtle gay subtexts all the time, on The Suite Life of Zack and Cody, The Wizards of Waverly Place, Even Stevens back in the 1990s).




He's grown up since, with muscles, tattoos, chest hair, and a beard, turning into a veritable bear.

In 2011 he played a teenage Robin Hood who attracts the attention of Neal on White Collar.

In 2013 he starred in Breaking Fat, a webseries spoofing Breaking Bad, about a trio of overweight girls who start a meth lab.  His medical student Matt is oblivious to the girls' romantic attention.

Some ample gay subtexts.



A rap artist as well as an actor, Dano has performed in several music videos, including "Summertime" and "Last Christmas," which are nearly pronoun-free:

Last Christmas, I gave you my heart
But the very next day you gave it away
This year, to save me from tears
I'll give it to someone special

He is the subject of gay speculation in real life, but hasn't made any public statements.

Timothy Leary, the Homophobic Guru of the 1960s Counterculture

The Youth Counterculture of the 1960s turned on to psychedelic drugs, especially LSD, as a means of achieving higher consciousness and recognizing your connection with all beings.

LSD trips were like sexual connections, the participants -- boys and girls both -- expressing love, friendship, and desire on a transcendent level.  As a result, when they came down, they weren't as homophobic as those who abstained from acid.  If it's not hurting anyone else, than whatever turns you on is cool.  Even if it's like, going with someone of another race (then illegal in 23 states), or two dudes going together.

The guy who almost single-handedly turned the Counterculture on to LSD was a Harvard psychologist named Timothy Leary, who started out studying the effects of psychedelics on consciousness in the late 1950s, then became an outspoken evangelist for the drug movement.  He believed that LSD could cure insanity, reduce recidivism in criminals, and eventually result in a society free from war, crime, injustice...and gay people.

Wait -- wasn't the guru of "Do your own thing" in favor of turning on with whatever turned you on?

No, not at all.

According to The Harvard Psychedelic Club by Don Lattin, Richard Alpert (later the guru Ram Dass) lived and worked with Leary for several years in the 1960s, even helping take care of Leary's children.

Most of their friends knew that Alpert was bisexual with a distinct preference for men.  He was constantly falling in love with cute guys, after all, and he and his wife had an open relationship.  But Leary didn't.  When he found out, he started screaming that Alpert was evil, and kicked him out of the commune.


Later, in an interview for Playboy magazine, Leary responded to allegations that sometimes otherwise heterosexual men engage in same-sex activity during the free-fall orgies of an LSD trip.  No, not at all, he said firmly.  In fact, using LSD is a proven "cure for homosexuality."  Hundreds of gay men have used the drug to overcome the hangups that made them think they were women, and went on to a "normal" heterosexual life.

Of course, nothing of the kind ever happened.  Leary was making the whole thing up.  But he had to have some way to reconcile his homophobia with the increasingly open sexuality of the generation he helped create.

He was also friends with gay poet Allen Ginsberg, his lover Peter Orlovsky, and many other gays of the Counterculture (pictured: Neal Cassidy).  Maybe he didn't realize it.

See also: Dr. Spock: The Kids Are All Right.


Mar 7, 2014

Fall 1988: Picking Up Russian

I remember every class I took as an undergraduate at Augustana College (1978-1982), from Fiction Writing, which convinced me not to become a novelist, to Paleontology, taught by the professor with the handcuff parties, to Culture and Civilization of Modern Germany, with the professor who kept denying that modern Germany suffered from "the problem" of  Homosexualitat.

 I remember most of my classes at Indiana University (1982-1984), from Victorian Literature, with the professor who kept giggling "this author was a homosexual!", to Restoration Literature, where Viju and I tried to determine if our professor was gay.

But I remember almost nothing from the University of Southern California, where I was working on a doctorate in Comparative Literature (1985-1989).  Maybe because I was busy with Raul and my bed-switching roommate, cruising Richard Dreyfuss, and bankrupting the porn industry. 




Or maybe because I hated everything about it.

Except for the cute fratboys, the statue of Tommy Trojan, and the reading room in the Philosophy Library.

1. The professors were very rich and very elitist, driving Porsches, reading The New Yorker (in Los Angeles), talking about their summer homes in Cabo.  One invited us to her house for pizza, and I thought "Finally, someone with regular tastes!"  Turned out to be goat cheese and arugula pizza.

2. The professors thought that they knew everything.  Unfortunately, what they knew was contradictory. One insisted that that all quotes in academic papers must be in the original language only, and another, that they be accompanied by English translations -- not a problem until they're both on your dissertation committee, ordering you to take the translations out and then put them in again.

3. They thought that graduate students were their personal servants.  One told me to go get him coffee.  Another wanted me to pick up his dry cleaning.

4. They were homophobic, insisting that I omit any reference to gay people from all of my papers.

5. They were insane. One went into a 5-minute tirade, loaded with personal invectives, whenever we said or wrote "the Renaissance mind."  We tried hard to avoid it, but it's such a common expression that occasionally someone goofed, and we had to listen to the tirade again.

6. Did I mention that they were insane?  My degree required a reading knowledge of French, German, and Italian, but my dissertation committee added "an ancient language."

So I spent a year cramming Latin.

Then when I changed my dissertation field from the Renaissance to the Symbolist Movement, the committee chair, Dr. Lazar, said "Oh, you should pick up another modern language.  How about Russian?"

"I don't think it's possible to pick up Russian in six weeks," I said.  "How about if I pick up a Russian instead?"

They stared, not comprehending.

"It's a joke.  Picking up a Russian...."

They stared.

"See, the phrase 'pick up' refers to meeting a stranger for an erotic encounter, so I said pick up a Russian...."

They stared.

I sighed.  "What about Turkish?"

Mar 6, 2014

Fall 1989: The Worst Job in the World

Tom the Big Boss, Sort of
In May 1989, when my doctoral dissertation committee rejected my third dissertation prospectus, I walked out of the conference room, drove away from USC and never went back.

I'd been planning on an academic career for four years -- what was I going to do now?  I thought back to Augustana, where I wanted to become an editor or translator, and got a job as an editor at the Getty Conservation Institute (founded by oil tycoon J. Paul Getty, whose grandson, Paul Getty Jr., was the object of some of my junior high fantasies).

It turned out to be the worst job in the world.

The 10 things I hated most about it:

1. There were a lot of heterosexist employees.  I got "Isn't that woman hot?", "What kind of girl do you like?" and "Would you kick that actress out of bed?" as often as in high school.  Tom the Big Boss was particularly obnoxious about it. And of course, no one in the 1980s was out at work.

He was tall, thin, bespectacled, a scholar, not one you would automatically assume to be heterosexist.  Not a bad physique (and yes, once I did get a peek in the men's restroom.  Not bad there, either).

2. Tom also used physical assault as a greeting.  Every time I saw him, he punched me -- hard -- on the shoulder.  I ended up being bruised every day.  And I couldn't say anything, because he was the boss.


The Getty Consternation Institute
3. It was not near the very beautiful Getty Museum, but in a warehouse district on Glencoe Avenue in Marina del Rey, with nothing nearby, no restaurants, no parks, nothing.  I had an hour for lunch, but with no place to go, I had to sit in the lounge eating my sandwich, and they always found me and said "We need this right away!  Your lunch can wait until later!"

4. The Getty Conservation Institute were involved in the preservation of art and archaeology around the world, so I figured I'd be getting around the world to edit articles on rock art in Australia. the Tomb of Nefertari in Egypt, the Mogao Grotto in China, or the Prado in Spain.

No, it was Tom who jetted around the world, having expensive dinners with the Minister of Antiquities of Peru or the Cultural Ambassador of Greece.  I worked for a subsidiary boss, Kathy, editing the abstracts of articles like "Functional Polymers for Chrome Fixation" and "Nitrogen for Biodeterioration Control on Museum Collections."


5. Every editorial change, even correcting typos, required me to fill out a form and get the boss's approval.  By the end of the day, there was a large stack of forms for Kathy and then Tom to approve.

6. Then I had to type the abstracts into an online database, get that approved by the boss, and file everything, abstracts, corrections, and Kathy and Tom's ok, into a vast bank of file cabinets. I was a secretary!

7. Kathy had no qualms about stealing my work.  I wrote a 50-page style manual for the editorial department, and she put her name on it, took it to Tom, and received a note "Great job!"

8. Abstracts could be submitted in Spanish, French, or German as well as English, but I wasn't allowed to touch those, in spite of my graduate work in Comparative Literature.  One day Kathy was running around the office with a question about Spanish.  "I can help!" I exclaimed.  "Oh, no, you wouldn't know about it." "Oh, I know quite a bit about Spanish," I protested, but she wouldn't hear of it.  Eventually she called the Spanish Department at UCLA to find out.

The question was: what do you call the thing on top of the "n" in Spanish?

It's a tilde.

I started bringing Don Quixote or Cien aƱos de soledad, untranslated, to sit prominently on my desk.


Graduate Student Intern, Not Tom
9. With all of the foreign dignitaries and archaeologists wandering in and out all the time, it was like an international airport.  I got sick a lot. 

10. There were a lot of high-strung, crazy employees.  Screaming fits were common.  Probably due to #1-9.

I started looking for a new job immediately.  A year later, I still hadn't found a new job, but I couldn't take it anymore, so:

 I printed out new first pages of the Style Manual, with my name as author, and substituted it on all of the copies.

 I typed up a letter of resignation, in Spanish, and left it on Kathy's desk.  

And on the way out of the office, I stopped by Tom's office and punched him hard on the shoulder.

Next: I teach Gay 101 at Juvenile Hall.

Jose Orozco:The Beefcake Murals of Mexico and New Hampshire

After the Mexican Revolution (1910-1920), a number of artists tried to restore the Mexican national identity through muralismo, distilling their anxieties over modernism, industrialization, human suffering, and war into huge murals.

Jose Orozco (1883-1949) was the most prolific of the muralistas, painting murals primarily in schools all over Mexico and the United States. He was also the adept at beefcake,  using muscular men to signify what is important and valuable in the human spirit.


Many of his works criticize the Mexican Revolution, and are regularly censored or dismissed by the Mexican government.

Others use more universal themes, such as "Prometheus," the Greek god who brought wisdom to humanity (in the Frary Dining Hall at Dartmouth College).











He often used arcane, mystical symbolism, tying him into the Western hermetic tradition where homoerotic activity was a conduit to godhood. For instance, "Omnisciencia," ("Omniscience," 1925), in the the Casa de los Azulejos  in Mexico City, shows an ecstatic male figure, rays of power shooting from his torso, flanked by nude male and female figures who are being manipulated by half-hidden gods.










"Civilization The Coming of Quetzalcoatl" (at the Hood Museum) is a homoerotic masterpiece, combining Western esoteric and traditional Mesoamerican motifs.  It shows five ancient Mesoamerican priests holding down a naked, muscular sacrificial victim, the knife posed like a phallus, with the Aztec god approaching as if he intends a sexual assault.

No indication if Orozco was gay.  He was married, with three children, but during his era, many gay people married.

The best place to see his murals is in the Orozco Room at the Hood Museum, on the campus of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (about 2 hours north of Boston).

Mar 5, 2014

Naked Rugby Team Calendars

When I was a kid in the 1970s, you could see naked guys only by sneaking into a locker room.  I didn't even know that pictures of naked guys were available until the spring of my freshman year in college, when Lars Lundquist, the photographer responsible for my brief modeling career, told me.  They were very rare, apparently acquired through mail order, passed from hand to hand like sacred texts.

When I turned 21, I found In Touch and Mandate at the adult bookstore in downtown Bloomington, Indiana.  So I could get about 20 pictures of naked guys every month, but the magazines were very expensive, about the equivalent of $20 each today.



Then came the internet, and cell phone self-photos, and suddenly 50,000,000 photos of naked guys were available with a few clicks.  All sizes and shapes.  Russian Orthodox priests, African-American bodybuilders, dwarfs into leather, fratboys dropping their pants at the Wal-Mart, whatever.  If you weren't careful, you could spend all day just accumulating and classifying hundreds of naked guy photos.

So why would anyone want to spend money on a calendar with amateur guys getting naked?

1. The guys are spectacular, the cream of the crop of amateur rugby players, rowers, military officers, Marines, and so on.  Although with the recent proliferation of nude male calendars, sometimes they're less spectacular celebrities, artists, factory workers, and farmers.  Nothing wrong with seeing some bodies of "regular guys."


2. It's for charity.  Since 2009, the Warwick University Rowing Club has stripped down every year for Sports Allies, which fights homophobia and bullying. Other groups strip down to fund breast cancer or AIDS research, or children's charities, or to memorialize a fallen comrade.

3. They're not heterosexist.  A few professional naked-male calendars are aimed specifically at gay audiences, but most are advertised with rhetoric like "for the ladies!"; "every woman's fantasy!"; or just "a woman's calendar."  These are usually advertised without specifying a gender.



4. Don't let these coy pictures fool you.  There are a lot of full frontal shots.

So far it's been mostly European and Australian men with the bollocks to pose nude for charity, but a few American teams have gotten in on the act, like the Nashville Grizzlies, a gay rugby team.

March isn't too late to get a 2014 calendar; they're half-price.

Yul Brynner: Bisexual Beefcake from Hollywood's Golden Age

Speaking of Yul Brynner, the Russian-born actor with the shaved head (1920-1985) was a reliable source of beefcake in the 1950s and 1960s.  While other actors were kept strictly under wraps, Brynner's chest and shoulders were usually on display, to add to his exoticism or sexiness.

Born in Vladivostok and raised in Paris, Brynner immigrated to the U.S. with his mother in 1940, and worked as a radio announcer for awhile before hitting Broadway.  In spite of the rumors, he never posed for physique magazines, though he did model nude for some private photos.








In 1951 he originated the role of Mongkut, King of Siam, in The King and I (he was to play Mongkut twice more in Broadway revivals, in the 1956 movie, and in a 1972-73 tv series).

No doubt the King's bare-chested costume added to his popularity.



In 1956 Brynner also starred in Anastasia and in The 10 Commandments; his Pharaoh Ramses began a fad for ancient Egyptian beefcake that lasted for about ten years.

Next came a string of adaptions of classics:  The Brothers Karamazov, The Sound and the Fury, Taras Bulba; plus Westerns, secret agent, and adventure movies.  He played Arabs, Russians, Native Americans, Mexicans, always with the shaved head and sultry looks, always with the physique.

One of his more interesting roles came in The Surprise Package (1960), in which he plays a thief who teams up with a deposed king (Noel Coward).




In The Magic Christian (1969), an anti-establishment movie in which a zany rich guy (Peter Sellers) and the hippie he adopts (Ringo Starr) set out to prove that money can buy not only love, but everything else.  Brynner plays a drag queen who cruises Roman Polanski. Apparently it wasn't his first time in drag.

 Although married four times, Yul Brynner was bisexual, and had relationships with Paul Newman,  Hurd Hatfield, Jean Cocteau, and Manuel Puig (who wrote Kiss of the Spider Woman).

Plus Marlon Brando; according to rumor, he provided the penis for that famous photo of Brando engaging in a homoerotic act.


There's a memorial to Brynner in his hometown of Vladivostok, including this full-sized statue (fully clothed). They probably don't know that he was bisexual.






Mar 4, 2014

Caddyshack: Masculine Women and Feminine Men

Danny gawks at Lacey, while his girlfriend gags
I saw Caddyshack (1980) during the summer after my sophomore year in college, shortly after I got back from my disastrous move to Omaha. It didn't make any sense to me then, and it doesn't now.  It seems to be several movies crammed into one.

1.  A snooty, easily riled judge (Ted Knight) runs the snooty Bushwood Country Club, where he butts heads with goldenboy golfer Ty (Chevy Chase) and boorish millionaire Czervik (Rodney Dangerfield).

2. There's some mild social critique: the club is restricted, no African-Americans or Jews.

3, The judge has boorish grandchildren and a niece, Lacey Underall, who sleeps with everyone she can find.

4. There's some class competition between the club snobs and the salt-of-the-earth caddies, who get to use the country club pool for 15 minutes once a year.  Somebody drops a candy bar in the pool.

5. The main caddy, Danny (Michael O'Keefe), butts heads with the more muscular Tony (Scott Colomby of One Day at a Time), sleeps with Lacey, has a pregnancy scare with his girlfriend, and wins a Caddy Scholarship so he can go to college.

6. Carl Spackler (Bill Murray) is a sleazy groundskeeper who keeps making visual penis gags (e.g., a water hose between his legs), and spends the movie fighting an animatronic gopher.  At the end of the movie, he blows up the golf course, and everybody dances.

Tony becomes Lacey's latest conquest

So is this absurdist comedy, nerd comedy, gross-out comedy, social satire, or what?

There are three things I'm sure of.

1. There are no gay slurs.

Most 1980s teen comedies have the characters spouting off against "fags" every five minutes, but there are no gay slurs at all. There are even a few minor gay references, as when Czernik is asked if he wants a driver (golf club) and quips "No, he's not my type.", or when Tony jumps up and down trying to spy on Danny and Lacey's tryst.

2. There is significant beefcake, if you like guys who are skinny and androgynous. Shirtless scenes, swimming pool scenes, underwear scenes while preparing for sex.

3. Androgyny is the rule.

Tony, the "hunk," is only mildly muscular, and Danny is downright skinny.  They both have big hair and pretty, androgynous faces.

Lacey is portrayed as the epitome of feminine beauty, so attractive that when she enters a room, every man's jaw drops.  However, she differs considerably from the 1980s "big everything" ideal of Lonnie Anderson and Dolly Parton, with short hair, a skinny frame, and breasts smaller than Tony's pecs.

Danny's "plain" girlfriend is likewise short-haired and small-framed.

Ty wants to be a human being
Tony has a little brother, Joey, who caddies with him.  But in a pivotal scene, the baseball cap comes off, and the boy turns out to be a girl.

Do feminine men sleeping with masculine women add up to gay symbolism?

Maybe the point is: gender should be irrelevant.  Be with whoever you want. As Ty said, "Let's pretend we're really human beings" (not masculine and feminine stereotypes).








Mar 3, 2014

The Fabulous Bridges Boys

Lloyd Bridges (1913-1998),  known to the first generation of Boomers as the hunky, often-shirtless star of Sea Hunt (1958-61), and to the second as Izzy Mandelbaum, the octogenarian personal trainer on Seinfeld, had four children.  Garrett died as an infant, and Cindy has been in only a few projects, but Boomer and Beau have had successful show biz careers of their own.

Born in 1949, Boomer was a favorite of gay Boomers, with a huge number of buddy-bonding movies.
1. With small-town high schooler Timothy Bottoms in  The Last Picture Show (1971) 
2. With boxer Stacey Keach in  Fat City (1972).
3. With racer Gary Busey in The Last American Hero (1973)
4. With bank robber Clint Eastwood in Thunderbolt and Lightfoot (1973)
5.With bodybuilder Arnold Schwarzenegger in Stay Hungry (1976)


He was also known for on-screen nudity, displaying his wares in Tron (1982) and Starman (1984)

Jeff specializes in quirky small-town types who listen to country-western music and drink beer in honky tonks.  I haven't seen any of his recent movies, except for The Fabulous Baker Boys (1989), where he buddy-bonded with his brother, and The Big Lebowski (1998), which is about bowling.

I hear that Crazy Heart (2009), about a washed-up country-western singer, has a gay character.







Jeff's older brother Beau, born in 1941, wasn't quite as popular among Boomers, although he began acting as a child, and had a starring role on Ensign O'Toole while still in his teens.

I first saw him as one of the muscular teenagers who grows into a giant (and in the process sheds his clothes) in the anti-hippie sci-fi movie Village of the Giants (1965) (with Tommy Kirk and Johnny Crawford as the "square" teens who save the day).

In 1967 he starred in The Incident, about two thugs (Martin Sheen, Tony Musanti) who terrorize the passengers on a subway car.  It's notable for having one of the first gay characters in the movies.




He specialized in serious dramas, often playing quirky small-town types, sometimes in gay-positive productions, such as Sordid Lives (2000).  Occasional gay characters, most recently in The Masters of Sex (2011-2013), about sex researchers Masters and Johnson.

Several of his children are actors.  Jordan, born in 1973, is best known for Drive Me Crazy (1999).


Mar 2, 2014

The Line of Beauty: Gay Dating in the 1980s

The BBC movie The Line of Beauty (2006) begins in 1983, the midst of the Reagan-Thatcher era of conservative retrenchment, as a young man named Nick Guest (Dan Stevens, right) goes to live with his school friend Toby and his sister Catherine.

Their father, Gerald Fedden, has just been elected a Conservative Member of Parliament, and they are all set to begin the privileged life of celebrity politicians, although they must hide their various problems: Toby's drug addiction, Catherine's mental illness, Gerald's philandering.

Sounds a lot like Brideshead Revisited, doesn't it?


Esconced in the conservative but scandal-laced household, Nick begins a secret gay life.  He dates the working class Leo (Don Gilet), who dumps him abruptly, and later dies of AIDS.

He dates Wani Ouradi (Alex Wyndham, below), the closeted heir to a supermarket chain, who is engaged to a woman and happy to keep their relationship a secret.  But Wani cruises constantly, even having sex with Jasper, Catherine's fiance.  Eventually Wani, too, becomes sick.





People occasionally discover that he is gay and react with disgust, but agree to keep his secret. Only Toby remains close. He begins using drugs to cope.

By 1987, the various scandals in the Fedden household have been revealed to the Press, and Gerald has no choice but to resign as MP.  He blames Nick for all of his problems, and kicks him out of the family that has been his own for four years.

I don't remember the 1980s being so desperate, at least in West Hollywood. We never used drugs, anonymous sexual encounters were frowned on, and only a few of our friends were personally affected by AIDS.

But I do remember the secrecy -- you simply did not tell heterosexuals.  You dropped pronouns; you lied about your weekend activities; you invented girlfriends. If they found out, you could expect disgust, yelling, excoriation, and then silence, as they cut off ties with you forever.