Dec 3, 2016

Top Coming Out Stories: Louie the Lilac to "Getting Some Cocks"

During the 1980s and 1990s, every time you met a new person, you exchanged coming out stories.

It doesn't happen anymore.  No one offers, and if you ask, the under-30 crowd says "What? Oh, I've always known that gay people exist.  My parents had gay friends over all the time."

But in the 1980s and 1990s, we all grew up in a world where gay people were never mentioned, heterosexual desire assumed universal..  It was interesting to hear how someone gradually pieced together clues, measured evidence, and concluded that "it is not raining upstairs."

It was a bonding experience.  It gave us a sense of camaraderie.

So here, preserved from the dark, quiet days, are the most interesting of the five hundred or so coming-out stories I've been told (Part 1):



Age 5: The Homosexuals

One day I was playing in the family room, and my father walked through with one of his friends.  I heard him say: "...and we need to do something about the problem of homosexuals...."  I didn't know what a "homosexual" was, but I knew that it had something to do with me.

Age 6: Louie the Lilac

I was watching the old Batman tv show, the episode where Milton Berle played Louie the Lilac, a villain who dressed in a lavender suit.  I thought it was the most beautiful thing in the world.  I asked my older brother, "Can I get a suit like that for Christmas?"  He laughed and said "Only if you're a lilac!"  Ever since then,  I associated the word "lilac" with being gay.

Age 8: The Babysitter

When I was little, I had a male babysitter, a teenage boy from the neighborhood, and I liked to sit on his lap.  I liked the warmth, the closeness -- and the feel of his basket!  One night I overheard him talking to his friend: "Yeah, the kid's very affectionate.  If I didn't know better, I'd think he had homosexual tendencies."

So "homosexual tendencies" meant "you like to sit on guys' laps."

Age 12: The Porn Magazines

When I was around 12 years old, my friends and I were walking through a wooded area near my house, when we saw some porn magazines that someone left lying on the ground.  We started leafing through them, the other guys gushing over the naked ladies, you know, when I saw an article called "Inside a Gay Bar."  I didn't know what "gay" meant, but I returned later to tear out the article and take it home.  It was about me!

Age 13: The Sleepover

I was spending the night with my best friend, sleeping in the same bed, and in the middle of the night I woke up to him...well, fondling me.

"Hey, what are you doing?" I whispered, shocked.

"It's ok," he said.  "All the guys do it.  It doesn't mean you're queer if you think about girls."

So I tried to think about girls, but I kept imagining guys.  That meant I was queer....

Age 13: The Alternative Prom

One day my mother, who taught high school English, came home and started complaining to my father: "You'll never guess what those idiots on the school board are up to now -- an alternative prom!  I can't believe they would pander to the deviants like that!"

I had never heard of gay people before, so I asked "What's a deviant?"

Mom said "You don't need to know.  It has nothing to do with you."

But I persisted, and finally she said, "A deviant is a pervert, a man who wants to go to the prom with another man."

Age 20: Getting Some "Cocks"

In the service I was stationed down in New Orleans, and when we had leave,  one of the guys in my barracks said "Let's go down to Bourbon Street and get us some cocks!"

I didn't realize that there were guys in the world who liked guys, so I said "Cool!  Let's go!"

Turns out that "cock" is Cajun slang for "girls," sort of like "chicks."

But the "damage" was done.  I knew that gay people were out there somewhere.  I just had to find them.

See also: Two Men Hugging.

Kurt Russell's Secret


We usually went to church on Sunday nights, but for some reason I was home one night in November 1968 to see the last half of the best movie ever made, The Secret of Boyne Castle, on the anthology series Wonderful World of Color.
This was former child star Kurt Russell's only movie as a Disney Adventure Boy (others included Peter McEneryTommy KirkTim Considine, and Jeff East) before he moved on to playing oddball outsider Dexter Riley in a series of Disney comedies.




Here Kurt plays Rich, an American exchange student in Dublin who learns that his older brother Tom (bisexual muscleman Glenn Corbett, previously a model for Physique Pictorial and star of Route 66) is not a steel company executive after all, but a spy charged with delivering essential information to Boyne Castle, in the west of Ireland. When Tom is captured by Russian agents, Rich must take over the mission, racing through the quaint villages and lush green hills of Ireland, hoping to elude capture and reach Boyne Castle before the Russians. Fellow student Sean (long-faced, steely-eyed Patrick Dawson) tags along, throwing himself into deadly danger for no logical reason except that he rather likes Rich.


The two are presented as more intimate than mere buddies, framed in tight shots, their faces together in close ups. While they are sleeping on the heather, Rich hears a suspicious noise, and wakes Sean by moving his own body slightly. Although all we see are their faces and necks, to wake someone with such a small gesture means that they must be cuddling together. They rescue each other a dozen times, and are eventually rescued by big brother Tom.



But the most important scene, the scene I have remembered fondly for 40 years:

At an inn, Rich flirts with a waitress.

“You didn’t tell me you had an eye for the ladies!” Sean exclaims, as if he hadn’t anticipated any competition.

Rich responds by asking the waitress if she has any rooms to rent for “for a few hours.” Suspicious, she wants to know why the two boys would need a room for such a short period.

Rich and Sean exchange a knowing grin.

In 1968 I was entranced by that grin. I knew that it was a clue to the secret. If only I could decipher it, I could find my way to that other world, Oz or Living Island or Middle Earth, the world where boys could fall in love and got married.

How might we account for the not-so-subtle homoerotic bantr between the Rich and Sean? Certainly Glenn Corbett might be a gay ally: he began as a model for the Athletic Model Guild, the Advocate Men of its day, and made a career as a buddy-bonding “man’s man. Kurt Russell was never particularly gay-friendly.

Patrick Dawson works mostly in Irish radio, but his limited filmography includes the gay-vague Ginger in The Jigsaw Man (1983). We should look at the director, Robert Butler, who in the 1960’s specialized in dramas with strong male leads, such as Ben Casey, Dr. Kildare, and I Spy, and later directed such hunk-fests as Remington Steele, Moonlighting, and Lois and Clark. Whether he was working with Bruce Willis, Dean Cane, Pierce Brosnan, or Kurt Russell, Butler neither minimized nor hid their physicality, allowing and even directing them to be open as objects of desire, both to male viewers and to each other.

There are nude photos of Kurt Russell on Tales of West Hollywood

See also: Kurt Russell

Dec 2, 2016

The Shy Guy at the Gym with the Supersized Penis


Plains, November 2016

At the YMCA the other night, when I was stripping down after my workout, the guy at the locker next to mine found an excuse to play around on his cell phone instead of taking off his gym trunks.  He was obviously going to wait until I was gone.

He was in his 20s, probably: his round baby face and short dark-brown hair made him look like a teenager.  Very tall, at least 6" taller than me, pale, with a smooth soft chest and a little belly.

"Poor thing," I thought.  "Being so tall will make his tiny meat look even smaller."

A rule of thumb for locker room cruising:

Guys with big ones walk to the showers with their towel in hand rather than around their waist, then stand around chatting nude at their lockers.

Guys with small ones hide behind a towel at all times, even putting on their underwear beneath it.  Sometimes they even refuse to take off their clothes until the bank of lockers around them is deserted.

I locked my locker, grabbed my towel (I never wrap it around my waist), and headed for the showers.  I was nearly finished when Baby Face finally arrived, and chose the stall across from me.  He carefully and deliberately faced the shower head, so none of the othe guys could see anything but his backside.

I soaped up a second time, hoping to get a glimpse, tiny or not.

A glimpse: my mouth dropped.  It was enormous!

Kovbasa++++!

The full story, with nude photos and sexual situations, is on Tales of West Hollywood.










Dec 1, 2016

The Top 12 Hunks of "Star Wars"

Star Wars, the science fiction franchise about political machinations and mystic knights in "a galaxy far, far away," began as a one-shot movie in 1977.  It has since blossomed into seven movies (with two more in the works), tv series, and a universe-full of tie-ins -- plus a remarkable amount of beefcake.  Here are the top 10 beefcake stars of the Star Wars movies.

The First Trilogy

1. In which two jedi warriors intervene into a trade dispute on a distant planet and meanwhile meet Annakin Skywalker, a boy with special jedi powers.  He grows into an impestuous teenager  (played by Hayden Chistiansen, left), intervenes into an attempted galactic secession, and eventually goes over to the Dark Side, becoming the evil Darth Vader.






2. Liam Neeson as Qui-Gon Jinn, one of the jedi warriors who mentors Annakin Skywalker.  The other is Obi Wan Kenobi, played by Ewan McGregor, who didn't make the list.
















3. Ahmed Best  as Jar-Jar Binks, the grotesque comic relief character.  Although Jar-Jar is computer generated, Ahmed provided the the voice, and the character's presence and movements for the other actors to play against.












4. Hugh Quarshie as Captain Panaka, the captain of the queen's guard.















The Second Trilogy

5. In which young, impetuous Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) joins the rebellion against the evil Galactic Empire, run by the evil Darth Vader, and helps destroy the super-weapon called the Death Star.   Luke eventually discovers that Darth Vader is his father, loses a hand, and destroys the Empire.














6. Harrison Ford as Han Solo,a rogue spaceship captain who grudgingly helps Luke.















7. David Prowse as Darth Vader.  He's always in a black suit and wearing a mask, so we never see him.  James Earl Jones provides the voice.  When he's finally unmasked, Sebastian Shaw provides the face.  Still, there's a muscular former bodybuilder in that Darth Vader suit.
















8. Billy Dee Williams as Lando Carissian, a wealthy benefactor to the resistance.




















9. The Third Trilogy, in which a new group of rebels arise, called the First Order, but this time they're the bad guys.  They're run by Kylo Ren (Adam Driver), who happens to be the son of Princess Leia and Han Solo from the previous trilogy.  Only one movie has appeared to date.














10. John Boyega as Finn, a reformed stormtrooper who joins forces with the Resistance (a paramilitary group dedicated to squashing the First Order).


















11. Oscar Isaac as Poe Dameron, a resistance fighter who buddy bonds with Finn.














12. Domhnall Gleeson as General Hux, one of the First Order warriors.



















Nov 30, 2016

Burn After Reading; Or Better Still, Burn Before Viewing

Three days after watching the execrable O Brother, Where Art Thou, the song "I Am a Man of Constant Sorrow" is still in my head.  My friend suggests that we add to my woes with Burn After Reading.

"I saw part of it before.  I walked out of the theater when a main character was killed halfway through.  Some comedy!"

"Give it a try," he says.  "Watch it all the way through before making a decision."

If I watch with him, there will be cuddling, and maybe some bedroom activity.  If I don't, probably not.  So...

Burn After Reading (2008) is a Coen Brothers "comedy" about a lot of old, bald, ugly guys in suits who have offices in Washington, DC.  Most deal with government secrets, but there's also a divorce lawyer, a plastic surgeon, and a guy who used to be a Greek Orthodox priest but now runs a gym.  I can't tell them apart, but according to the IMDB, they're played by John Malkovich, Richard Jenkins, David Rasche, J. K. Simmons, Olek Krupa, Michael Countryman, J.R. Horne, Hamilton Clancy, and Armand Schultz.

The main one is Ozzie (John Malkovich), who resigns from the agency and writes his memoirs, which he puts on a computer disk.

Meanwhile his wife is having an affair with fellow agent Harry (George Clooney), the only guy in Washington DC with hair.

In preparation for asking for a divorce, she copies all of Ozzie's financial information, plus his memoirs, onto a computer disk.  She give it to her lawyer, whose secretary loses it at the gym.


Where it is found by two conniving gym employees, the dimwitted Chad (Brad Pitt) and Linda (Frances McDormand).  They think it contains government secrets, and blackmail Ozzie for its safe return.  When he balks, they try to sell it to the Russians.

Why are they committing this act of treason, the only crime other than aggravated homicide that can get them the death penalty?

Linda wants money for liposuction for her saggy arm and belly fat.

Even though her doctor tells her that those areas will respond to exercise.

And she works at a gym.

Chad is just an idiot.

Did I mention that Linda also happens to be dating  Harry, the guy having an affair with the wife of the man she's blackmailing?  Unbeknownst to any of them, of course.

At this point, I'm wondering who the protagonist is.  Who am I supposed to be identifying with, rooting for, hoping things will work out for?  These are all unpleasant, slimy, horrible people.

Harry is a runner.  Maybe I'll root for him.

Sneaking around the house looking for more government secrets, Chad accidentally encounters Harry, who thinks he's the man that's been following him (in another plotline).  Harry shoots him and disposes of the body.

He doesn't know it's Chad, of course, so later he agrees to help Linda find her missing friend.

Ozzie, meanwhile, believes that Linda's boss is the blackmailer, and kills him.

We adjourn to some old, bald, ugly guys sitting around talking about what happened next. It's complicated, but it ends up with with Ozzie in a coma, Harry in Venezuela, and Linda agreeing to keep quiet if they pay for her liposuction.

Keep quiet about what?  The agency hasn't done anything.

So probably another hour of plot time is covered in a brief synopsis.

It's like watching The Wizard of Oz, all the way up to where Dorothy and her companions reach the Emerald City, then adjourning to Dorothy telling Aunt Em "So we went to the witch's castle, with lots of adventures on the way, and in the end we defeated her."

Terrible way to end a terrible movie.

Gay content:  

A tiny bit of beefcake, the rather muscular arms and shoulders of one of the guys Linda has sex with.  Clooney and Pitt are fully clothed throughout.  Coming Up Daisy, the romantic comedy that Linda brings her dates to, stars Dermot Mulroney, but he's fully clothed, too.

One homophobic slur.

One racist stereotype.

Brad Pitt's character is probably gay, but nothing is ever said.  He just fails to express any interest in women.

But at least I got some bedroom activity out of the deal.

Nov 29, 2016

The Promised Land of Gigantic Penises

Rock Island, July 1991

Lane and I are back in Rock Island for a week, visiting my family and old friends, going to my old haunts.

On Saturay night, we go to JR's, Rock Island's only gay bar, and meet a bear named Dave: in his 50s, grey hair and beard, hairy chest.  He's lived in Rock Island for all of his life, but we never ran into each other at the bars or at the church:

"My partner and I stayed pretty much to ourselves.  When we wanted community, we went to Chicago.  It was only after we broke up last year -- he dumped me for a Cute Young Thing -- that I started looking at the gay life in Rock Island."

 We go back to his apartment in Davenport for "sharing."  He's on the small side..

 Which is fine with me.

In the morning we have breakfast and tell him about life in the gay mecca of West Hollywood.  Gay men everywhere, not just in the bars, but at the gym, in the supermarket, strolling down the street.  Your friends, your neighbors -- all gay men.

"It sounds great," Dave says, "But here in the Midwest we have something that you'll never get out in La-La Land.  The biggest penises in the world."

"Well, I don't know about that," I tell him.  "I've seen some pretty big ones."

"You haven't seen anything like these!" Dave exclaims.  "Are you guys busy this afternoon?  I can lead you to the Promised Land of gigantic penises."

The full story is on Tales of West Hollywood.

Porgy and Bess: Black Beefcake Folk Opera

I never saw "the American folk opera" Porgy and Bess (1935) before my celebrity boyfriend took me in the spring of 1987, though we played some of the songs in orchestra in high school. They're fun, though sometimes tainted by casual heterosexism.  In "It' Ain't Necessarily So," we hear the Biblical story of Methuselah, who lived 900 years:

Who calls dat livin', when no gal will give in, to no man who's lived 900 years.

It's really not so much an opera as a Broadway musical (and there are musical versions), so it has the standard obsession over "love! love! love!"   But what other musical is going to give you blasphemy, drugs, murder, prostitution, beefcake, and gay symbolism?




Set in the Catfish Row neighborhood of Charleston, South Carolina, it stars Bess, a drug addict and prostitute who is looked down upon in the community.  When her pimp, Crown, goes on the lam after killing someone, Bess needs a new man. She selects disabled beggar Porgy.  They fall in love.

Meanwhile innocent bystander Peter is arrested for the murder. 

Many fishermen are killed in a storm. 

Their women mourn them.

Crown returns, rapes Bess, and is murdered.  Porgy is arrested.  Released, he returns, rich from a crap game, but Bess has run  off with oily drug dealer Sportin' Life.



With agony and bitter tears all around, the curtain falls.

And the end result, other than angst and sadness?

A mostly black cast displaying a lot of beefcake.  Muscular, semi-nude Joshua Henry (top photo, from Dream Girls), Norm Lewis (second photo), Donovan Singletary (left).  Black beefcake is rare on screen, and even more rare on stage, except maybe in productions of The Wiz.

And gay symbolism: every woman has her man, and mourns him when he is killed or put in prison, which always happens. Men are always unfaithful to their women.  Relationships are always temporary; "a woman is a sometime thing."



The moral: heterosexual romance is always doomed.

 What remains are men together, singing joyfully as they play craps or head out to the sea in ships.

What remains are women together, singing mournfully as they comfort each other over their losses.

Same-sex romance is, in the end, valued.

Nov 28, 2016

Dean Stockwell: Gay Subtexts and Homophobic Texts

In a career spanning 65 years, Dean Stockwell has played everything, from cute kid to elderly statesman, including many projects with homoromances and/or homophobia.

As a boy:

1. The Boy with Green Hair (1948), a classic tale of the impact of being different in the ultra-conformist Cold War era.

2. Kim (1950), a retelling of the Kipling book about a teenage secret agent in colonial India, who gets a rather overt crush on adventurer Mahbub Ali (Errol Flynn).









As a young man:

3. Compulsion (1959), Alfred Hitchcock's homophobic thriller about gay murderers, loosely based on the 1920s Leopold-Loeb case.  Judd Steiner (Dean) and Artie Stein (Bradford Dilman) kill a young boy for fun.  Dean was also in the Broadway play, opposite Roddy McDowell.

4. Sons and Lovers (1960).  An adaption of the D. H. Lawrence novel. A boy in love with his mother (a 1950s trope for "gay") finds mature hetero-romance with a woman.

5. Psych-Out (1968).  Dean (right) has a small part as a hippie who grooves on Jack Nicholson.

6. The Loners (1972).  A hippie couple, Stein (Dean) and Alan (Todd Sussman), plus a girl, are on the lam after killing a cop.  In 1972, this meant that they were counterculture heroes.




In middle age:

7. Blue Velvet (1986).  He plays Ben, the prissy gay psychopath who is holding Dorothy's son hostage, and orchestrates the various characters' attempts to seduce and destroy each other.

8. Quantum Leap (1989-93). Dean played Al, the holographic mentor/best buddy of time-slipping scientist Sam Beckett (Scott Bakula). There were two homophobic episodes.

9. Rites of Passage (1989).  A homophobic father (Dean) inadvertently pushes his son into the arms of a psycho killer.

With all the homophobic texts and homoromantic subtexts, it was difficult to determine if Dean is an ally or an enemy.  His biography doesn't say, but it does point out that in the 1970s he tried to avoid the draft by pretending to be gay.

My Date with Two Brothers... and Their Dad

During my horrible year at Hell-fer-Sartain State University in a far north suburb of Houston, the worst place in the world, I tried to find a boyfriend by placing a personal ad in The Montrose Voice:

But most respondents lived in the Montrose, an hour away in Houston.  Others lived even farther away, in far-flung southern suburbs, even in Galveston. So I was overjoyed to hear from someone who lived only about 10 miles away (a half-hour drive in Houston traffic).

Jack said he was 24 years old, a little older than me, an English major at the University of Houston, with exactly my interests: literature, science fiction, classical music, languages, and foreign travel.  Plus, he said, he had a bodybuilder's physique and a Mortadella+ beneath the belt.

That was probably just "personal ad" bragging. But I didn't care. I would have accepted a date with a garden troll that was male, breathing, and less than an hour away.

He said he was laid up with a broken leg, and couldn't go out.  So I drove out to the house, a weird gray Tudor surrounded by crazy thin acacia trees and a bare mud lawn.

The door opened before I got to the front porch.  A shirtless guy stood in the doorway: short, compact, dark-skinned, just my type.  But definitely not 24.  Probably a teenager.

"I'm Eric, Jack's brother," he whispered.  "Keep your voice down -- my stepfather is asleep.  This way."

Brother!  Stepfather!  I thought we'd be alone!

The full story, with nude photos and sexual situations, is on Tales of West Hollywood.

Nov 27, 2016

A Sleepover, Sausage Sighting, and Fondling of My Cousin Phil

When I was growing up in Rock Island, we traveled to northern Indiana once or twice a year to visit my grandparents and uncles and aunts and cousins.  We always visited my Aunt Nora and her family, even stayed with her sometimes.  My earliest  sausage sighting was of her teenage son, Joe, when I was 7 1/2 years old.

But Dad didn't get along with his oldest sister, Aunt Edna, so we never visited her, and saw her only rarely, at an occasional Thanksgiving Dinner.  I knew only a little about her family: her husband, Uncle John, fat and blustering; a grown-up daughter, who moved to California; and Cousin Phil, about ten years older than me.

As far as I can remember, I've only met Cousin Phil four times in my life.  One of them resulted in a sausage fondle.





The full story, with nude photos and sexual situations, is on Tales of West Hollywood

O Brother, Where Art Thou: Yet Another Coen Brothers Mess

Last night my friend and I were channel-surfing on Netflix, when O Brother, Where Art Thou? (2000) appeared.

"Next!"  I exclaimed.  "It's by the Coen Brothers.  Their movies make no sense."

"You have to see this one!" My friend exclaimed.  "It's a cinema classic.  A masterpiece!"

So I watched.

It's set in a surreal, sepia-toned 1930s Mississippi, where the fast-talking con-man Everett (George Clooney) and his dimwitted companions, Pete (John Turturro) and Delmar (Tim Blake Nelson), escape from a convict chain-gang and dash across the countryside, trying to get to some loot that Everett said he buried.  But he actually is conning them: there is no "buried treasure."  He just wants to reunite with his estranged wife and numerous daughters.

I'm not sure how many daughters: more and more kept popping up.

Meanwhile they're being chased by a sheriff, the governor, and various other baddies.

I'm not sure how many. baddies  It looked like an infinite series of fat Southern men, sweating in white suits and Panama Hats and calling each other "sumbitches."

On the way, they encounter a variety of surreal, possibly supernatural threats.

Three sirens who have been apparently just sitting around, singing a song about death (Come and lay your bones on the alabaster stones and be my ever-lovin' baby), while waiting for three men who they can seduce and rob.

Hundreds of Ku Klux Klansmen marching in unison, like the guards of the Wicked Witch of the West, while a red-clad Satanic figure sings about death (Well I am Death, none can excel, I'll open the door to Heaven or Hell)

Bank robber George "Baby Faced" Nelson, who brings them on his latest caper, but then is captured and paraded down the street with torches and a guitar accompaniment, while he imagines his death.

A grotesque blind radio dj, who thinks they are are all African-Americans and records their song (I am a man of constant sorry, no pleasure here on Earth I've found).  Which becomes a hit, and convinces a cotillion-full of Southerners to not be racist anymore and run the gubernatorial candidate out on a rail.

I think.  Or maybe it was the head Klansman.  I don't know; the dozens of fat Southern men in white suits and Panama hats all look alike.

According to the IMDB, they include Big Dan Teague (John Goodman), Pappy O'Daniel (Charles During), Junior O'Daniel (Del Pentecost), Homer Stokes (Wayne Duvall), Vernon T. Waldrip (Ray McKinnon), Sheriff Cooley (Daniel Von Bargen).  But they're all really Sheriff Lobo, aren't they?

The plot, such as it is, depends on crazy coincidences and people acting crazy.


And what's with the constant soundtrack of horrible folk and Gospel songs, mostly a capella, mostly about dying:

My latest sun is sinking fast, my race is nearly run
My strongest trials now are past, My triumph is begun.

When I die, Hallelujah, by and by, I'll fly away

Seems the light is swiftly fading, brighter scenes they do now show
I am standing by the river, angels wait to take me home

I know the Coen Brothers are obsessed with death, and like to kill off main characters in the middle of their movies, but these songs were depressing, irrelevant to the plot, and hurt my ears almost as much as the unpleasantly grotesque characters hurt my eyes.

The only thing I liked about it was the minimal heteronormativity.  Other than the siren-seduction and the goal of reuniting with the estranged wife, there is no hetero-romance, no girl-oggling.  Even Boss Hogg doesn't have a feminine coterie.  This is a masculine world, with women around only to provide most of the whiny songs about death.

You can even find some gay subtexts in the guys rushing off to rescue each other from threats.

Not that there's any beefcake.  The men are all either fat and sweating or dirty, smelly, and snaggle-toothed.  It would be rather distasteful to touch any of them, even the ones who are attractive in other productions.



Well, at least, Quinn Gasaway, who played "Boy Hogswallop," son of a cousin who betrayed the trio, grew up into a hunk.  He's done a lot of theater, and in 2016 he starred in Gay, Straight, Married.

Why is the title O Brother, Where Art Thou?, when there are no missing brothers?

I have no idea.