Sep 12, 2013

Christian Beadles: The Face of Evil

This is Christian Beadles, age 16.  He's a close friend of Christian Fortune and teen idol Justin Bieber, and a singer in his own right, performing in music videos such as "Doctor Stalker" and "Yes, I Can."

A goofy grin.  A pleasant personality (I surmise).  Fun-loving. Talented.  The face of evil.

It' not that he lacks moral reasoning skills, he just decides to put them on hold now and then to dehumanize people.  That's the definition of evil.

It's not his fault.  Throughout his life, he has been taken to regular meetings where he is informed that he has enemies.  A group of people -- not really people, they lost their humanity years ago -- are scheming to overturn the natural order, destroy civilization.  Destroy him.

God hates them even more than he hates real people.  After all, doesn't He say in His book that they should be put to death?  It's right next to statements about other monsters deserving of death -- those who eat shellfish, wear clothing of mixed wool and linen, and work on the Sabbath.

But no one in the meetings talks about those other monsters.  They zero in one one group, scapegoats responsible for all of the world's problems, someone distant and alien to distill all of their hatred onto.

It's ludicrous, yet he believes it.  We are all capable of believing ludicrous things, especially when we hear them over and over.

"What I tell you three times is true," says Lewis Carroll.

But now that he's famous, Christian can no longer believe that they are distant, alien monsters.  He sees them every day.  They are his classmates, his fans, even his friends.

Does he ever think  "Wait -- how can I be friends with someone who is scheming to destroy the world?"

Or is it just a fact, to be accepted regardless of how ridiculous it is?  Regardless of how much pain it causes in the fans and friends, vulnerable gay teens who conclude "Maybe I'm a monster after all."

Maybe he does think.  Maybe there are doubts in his mind.  Maybe, as he encounters more of them, he  will develop the ability to see that they're just people, not monsters, he will get the courage to reject hate.